Categories
Trucks

OBSERVATIONS: UNOH 200 at Bristol Motor Speedway

There’s always talk about the action picking up when it is playoff time, and that is certainly appearing to be the case in the NASCAR Gander Outdoor Truck Series as they started off their post-season with a bang.

Throughout the entire UNOH 200, the playoff drivers were mixing it up with not only each other, but their fellow competitors on the track. Nobody appeared to be giving each other an inch, with bumps being traded throughout the field, and some going around as a result. 

The fans have been asking for the old Bristol to come back, and if Thursday night is any indication, they got their wish. It’s easy to see why they wanted the bottom groove to be prime real estate as sparks flew, with drama throughout the night.

Certainly the drivers who grew up running tracks of this style with a rough edge to their driving enjoy it. Just ask Ross Chastain.

“That’s what built this place,” he said. “You come through this tunnel, and there’s talk about rattling cages, there’s helmets thrown. If we’re going to fill these places up, the CarShield Chevy’s going to be the one that adds to the excitement.”

He certainly made true on that promise, certainly throwing his elbows up each time he got the chance. He ran up inside the top-five from the drop of the green flag until the pit crew was deemed for “too many men over the wall.” Restarting at the tail of the field, he made his way up through the field – aggressively with his fair share of bump and runs for his competitors in the process, ultimately spinning Raphael Lessard.

His driving wasn’t well received post-race, as he was met by a couple crew members of Kyle Busch Motorsports.

“I think the crew chiefs come down here and puff their chests out—they’re old washed-up race car drivers,” Chastain said. “I love Marcus (Richmond) and Rudy (Fugle), but, my goodness, let your drivers come handle it. And one at a time, line ‘em up, and let’s race. And let’s handle it after, outside the race car.”

Chastain’s aggressive nature has been put under the microscope before, with other competitors in the garage area expressing their opinions. It also resulted in Justin Allgaier spinning him in an NASCAR Xfinity Series race following contact. 

Well it’s clear that he knows how to dish it, it could easily come back to bite him. Kyle Busch Motorsports doesn’t have a truck in the playoffs, but they could affect the outcome if they resort to payback for Chastain. It could also easily be someone else.

Does Chastain want his aggressive fellow competitors to be the reason why he doesn’t complete his ultimate Watermelon Man Challenge of winning the championship? 

But rest assured, he is not the only playoff driver in the midst of controversy with Stewart Friesen and Matt Crafton trading jabs at each other during the event. Both competitors finished in the top-10, and talked about their differences following the event. Experience tells them to make sure feuds are put to bed, right?

EMAIL ASHLEY AT ashley.mccubbin@popularspeed.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER:@ladybug388

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Are We Forgetting About Enfinger?

This weekend the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series will crown it’s 2019 Regular Season Champion, and if you have been paying close attention, you will already know who it will likely be.

However, if you haven’t, the driver currently holding a 55-point advantage may come as a surprise, as he is not one of the six competitors that have won this season. No, but instead this driver has established themselves with four stage wins, seven top-fives, and 12 top-10’s.

Grant Enfinger, driver of the No. 98 Thorsport Ford, who has shown that you do not need to flashy to be a champion in NASCAR’s top-three series with the playoff format.

That is not a bash at the points system either, but rather a compliment. You see, it’s a model that rewards consistency, and throughout the regular season, Enfinger has been exactly that.

He has only finished outside the top-20 once, and outside the top-seven four times. It is not the most dominant of stats, but regardless of the format, they are numbers that can easily win a championship.

Now, as stated earlier, the championship is not his yet; however, the road to glory one has just one small hurdle left. Enfinger needs a 24th-place finish or, four-stage points, to guarantee himself a huge advantage heading into the playoffs.

Now, let’s talk about that advantage.

The regular-season champion is not just a name, as if Enfinger does in indeed capture the title, he would receive 15 additional playoff points. For a driver who has consistently been near the front, this would go a long way in the end goal of making the Championship 4.

In fact, if the No. 98 team were to continue the pace they have set this year, this advantage could pretty much cement their spot at Homestead, regardless of if they win or not.

Now, whether or not Enfinger could go to Homestead and win the championship, without at least winning that race is debatable. Regardless though, this possible award should be the awakening for everybody that it is time to start taking this teams seriously.

Enfinger and company have proven themselves and should be among the favorites for the 2019 Gander Outdoors Truck Series Championship.

EMAIL MITCHELL AT mitchell.breuer@popularspeed.com

TWITTER: @MitchellB66

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Three Crew Members Suspended from Sheldon Creed’s Team

Everybody may have fun in the NASCAR Gander Outdoor Truck Series’ lone race on dirt this season, but it was not smiles for everyone leaving.

Three crew members from Sheldon Creed‘s team have been suspended as a result of violating Section 20.3.4.a of the NASCAR Rule Book having to do with ballast containers. Crew chief Jeff Stankiewicz, truck chief Austin Pollak and engineer Jonathan Stewart will miss the next three events on the schedule. 

The penalty comes after the No. 2 Chevrolet Silverado had a ballast fall out during practice leading up to the Eldora Dirt Derby. Creed ultimately scored a runner-up in the race on Thursday night. 

GMS Racing has announced they will not appeal the penalty, with Darren Fraley serving as the interim crew chief for the next three events. An engineer with GMS in 2018, he helped Justin Haley earn three wins, nine top-five’s, and 18 top-10 finishes. 

EMAIL ASHLEY AT ashley.mccubbin@popularspeed.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER:@ladybug388

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Tyler Ankrum Hopeful of Finding Funding to Make Championship Run

When Tyler Ankrum climbed out of the truck in victory lane at Kentucky Speedway, the first words out of his mouth were simple – “Hopefully it means a sponsor.” After all, if he is able to make a run for the title, it’ll mean overcoming adversity.

He missed the first three races due to not being 18-years-old yet, but was granted a waiver from the sanctioning body. Then once he was able to compete, he had to start and park on two occasions with NEMCO Motorsports due to a lack of funding.

His efforts seem to be paying off, though, as evident by earning the victory last weekend. Now Ankrum is one of the drivers locked into the post-season to battle for the 2019 NASCAR Gander Outdoor Truck Series Championship – if everything comes together as they hope.

“This day and time, sponsorship is hard to come by,” David Gilliland commented. “Obviously we’re going to work hard, as hard as we can. Wins help everything. We’ll dig our heels in and see what we can do to make that happen. We’ve run up until now and we’re going to do everything we can to go out and try to win a championship. That’s been our ultimate goal and we finished 1, 2 in the K&N Series last year, so we can win championships. We’re not going to stop until we go for it again. We’ll see what we can do.”

For now, all Ankrum can keep doing is performing behind the wheel to hopefully open the door of opportunity. That’s why moving forward, he is going to focus on learning how to be a better driver. 

“There’s no such thing as perfection in this sport,” he commented. “You can chase perfection and you can be the closest to perfection, but it’s kind of like chasing a pot of gold under the rainbow. You’ll never find it, but you can definitely be the closest to it. Going forward, I’m really looking for consistency. I feel like I need to run better in the stages. I feel like I need to get better at restarts. Most definitely I need to get better at restarts. Still overwhelmed by what these guys have done and what these Tundras bring.

“I think the preparation we’ll have going forward – like we were so prepared for this race and all the races in the past, we brought it all together tonight. Granted, in a way we did get lucky with fuel and (Brett) Moffitt was a lap short, but in my mind a win is still a win and we led laps. We were able to hold off the 99 (Ben Rhodes) for what seemed like forever. I was fighting against the 99 for the longest time. Going forward, I’m going to be looking for consistency and just performing better.”

EMAIL ASHLEY AT ashley.mccubbin@popularspeed.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER:@ladybug388

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Lupton Continues To Prove Himself

In the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series, it is becoming increasingly more important that you take advantage of the opportunities you receive. Success could guarantee you more chances to prove yourself and may allow you to climb the ladder further in NASCAR. However, failure could get you knocked out the sport.

Dylan Lupton is a driver that knows this well.

The 25-year-old had been looking for any opportunity after last competing in NASCAR in June 2018. Over a year later, Lupton finally got his chance to return as DGR-Crosley Racing with a six-race schedule, with his first race coming at Chicagoland Speedway.

Now, this wasn’t a guarantee Lupton was going to end up back in the sport more consistently, as at the end of the six races, he could be exactly where was before the deal. So ultimately, it was critical for his career that he did well with DGR, which he has.

At Chicago, Lupton qualified and ran inside the top-10 before finishing tenth. A solid day for a driver who, let’s not forget, was not in NASCAR in anyway for over a year.

The California-native returned to the seat this weekend at Kentucky, where again he impressed. Lupton scored his first top-five with a fifth-place finish, which is a statement itself for part-time. However, what may have been more impressive was how he got there.

He started the night in 20th in a race that seemed chaotic, with several multi-truck accidents and fuel strategy biting a lot of the race’s top contenders as the race neared its conclusion. However, at the end of the Buckle Up in Your Truck 225, Lupton had a damage-free No. 15 and a career-best finish.

It has only been two races, but Lupton is doing everything that he needs to be doing and more. If the next four races for him go as well, and his current trend of succeeding continues, then it should open up more opportunities. Specifically, a full-time ride.

Let’s face it, Lupton is doing all of this without a lot of time to prepare, that it makes it interesting to wonder what he would be doing if he were given a more consistent, guaranteed, that allowed him to grow with a team for more than just six races.

EMAIL MITCHELL AT mitchell.breuer@popularspeed.com

TWITTER: @MitchellB66

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Ankrum’s Perfection at Kentucky Leads Him to Victory

Tyler Ankrum made his eighth start with DGR-Crosley Racing in the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series at Kentucky Speedway capturing his first career win.

The 18-year-old became a first-time winner, now hopeful to take the next step towards making a name for himself in NASCAR.  

The victory comes after missing the first three races of the season and the Buckle Up Your Truck 225 being only his twelfth start in the Truck Series. 

The California native began his early career running quarter midgets where he eventually moved up to late models. Ankrum had a breakout year last season in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East, capturing four victories, the Sunoco Rookie of the year and most importantly, the championship.

After winning at popular tracks like South Boston Speedway and Iowa Speedway, now Ankrum can add Kentucky to his list. It also adds to his season totals as he entered this weekend with a top-five and three top-10 finishes. His best result prior to visiting victory lane was third and came at Texas Motor Speedway which is a 1.5-mile track like Kentucky Speedway.

Prior to the weekend, Ankrum and the DGR-Crosley team were hopeful that a clean weekend may ultimately lead them to a victory.

“I’m excited about Kentucky,” Ankrum said. “I think we’ve been getting more competitive every week and I believe what we have been working on with our Tundra’s will catalyze this weekend. I have high hopes and I think we can win.”

The 18-year-old led a career high of 40 laps and took the lead with less than five laps to go as Brett Moffitt ran out of fuel. Now Ankrum is locked into the post-season.

“Hopefully it means a sponsor – holy cow!” Ankrum said in victory lane. “I cannot believe I just did this.Man, it’s going to take a lot of work. Honestly, one of my biggest faults is I’ve always doubted myself. I kind of feel like all that has washed away. I can’t thank David Gilliland and DGR-Crosley enough.”

He has experience also in crew chief Kevin Manion, who was on top of the pit box for Ankrum; the veteran captured his first win in the Truck Series since 2017.

Momentum coming into the weekend paid off for the young driver. As good as Ankrum has been in the 1.5 mile tracks this season, it was not a surprise that he performed so well in Thursday night’s Buckle Up 225.

With the playoffs inching closer, it’s going to be interesting to see if Ankrum can find funding to allow him to compete for a championship.

EMAIL BRANDON AT: brandon.rivero@popularspeed.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER: @MrBrandonRivero

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Natalie Decker Learning, Gaining Experience in Trucks

JOLIET, Ill. – A lot of eyes are on the career of Natalie Decker, who is running her first part-time schedule in the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series in 2019.

Through 10 races, she has four finishes inside the top-20, with a best of 13th at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. When asked her thoughts about the season, Decker says she’s “learned a lot”, and gave a lot of praise to her team, DGR-Crosley Racing.

“I love the team that I’m with. I couldn’t have picked a better team,” Decker told POPULAR SPEED. “DGR-Crosley, they’re so amazing, and having David Gilliland as the owner and just being able to lean on him and ask him a lot of questions whenever you want, that’s just a wonderful tool to have.”

While it is her first year running multiple truck races, Decker is not inexperienced though, having competed in multiple racing series. Her 2019 schedule has included races in the ARCA Menards Series and NASCAR K&N Pro East Series, in addition to making a start in the Trans-Am Series.

While knowing what to expect with ARCA being that she ran the full schedule in 2018, it made the transition to K&N easy due to being very similar. However, Trans-Am has been a different experience for her.

“That’s really fun because it’s road racing and it’s really new to me,” Decker said. “Then it’s also going to help if we ever go road racing in the truck or whatever. It’s a good experience just to always be in a race car every weekend.”

With that experience, she has developed skills, including the ability to manage a vehicle throughout lengthy portions of a race, something she believes she’s been able to carry into the truck series.

“We’re better on the long run in a race and, I feel like that’s a big strength to have no matter what you’re racing. That’s something that I’ve always really been good at so it’s good to bring it back over into the trucks. And we have every series that I’ve been in, that’s just probably one of my best strengths.”

Decker did admit though that there are areas that need to be worked on, which includes being better at the beginning of the race weekends.

“What we really need to improve on this season is when we unload for practice, especially all these new tracks we go to, is just learning faster and getting up to speed faster,” Decker said. “That will just help in the long run and that will help instead of learning it all and getting up to speed in the race, just doing it right away in practice.”

As she looks towards the rest of the season, Decker is keeping her goals within reach.

“My goal is definitely getting top-15’s,” Decker said. “That’s a big goal of mine. And then just carrying that through the rest of the season.”

Decker managed to accomplish that goal at Chicagoland Speedway on Friday night after she finished the Camping World 200 in 14th. With nine races left on her schedule, she will compete again in the No. 54 Toyota on July 11th at Kentucky Speedway.

EMAIL MITCHELL AT mitchell.breuer@popularspeed.com

TWITTER: @MitchellB66

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Where does NASCAR draw the line with hard racing?

Over the last two weeks, there has been no shortage in drama between the NASCAR K&N Pro Series West and the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series. In both the NAPA Auto Parts 150 and the M&M’s 200, viewers were treated to a wide range of hard racing and it’s end results, which begs the question– where does NASCAR draw the line? 

Hard racing is by no stretch a bad thing for the sport. It provides viewers with excitement and has the ability to boost ratings for NASCAR . Some of the sport’s brightest stars have even made a name for themselves with aggressive racing styles. While this type of competition, is generally a positive thing for the sport, drivers will understandable get upset, and those reactions can lead to boundaries being crossed. 

During the closing laps at Colorado National Speedway on June 9, Bill McAnally Racing teammates Hailie Deegan and Derek Kraus made headlines after Deegan spun Kraus entering Turn 4, coming to the white flag.

Was the move Deegan made on Kraus warranted? It depends how you look at what happened prior to the final contact made.

Kraus, who had been battling adversity since Lap 50 with a broken sway-bar, managed to keep himself in contention for the win in the NAPA Auto Parts 150, restarting third and directly behind Deegan. When the green flag waved on the final restart, the past series champion opted to make the most of his opportunity and took Deegan and Jagger Jones three-wide entering Turn 1, ultimately getting into the left rear of Deegan’s No. 19 Toyota Camry. Deegan, justifiably upset with the move made by her teammate, spun Kraus and his No. 16 Toyota Camry entering Turn 4 to lock down her second win of the 2019 season.

“I think it’s just short track racing,” Kraus told POPULAR SPEED. “She (Deegan) drove it pretty deep on the last restart and drifted up the hill. I saw a hole and I took it of course — like any driver would. I got into her a little bit and coming to the white flag I got loose, then she got into me and everyone saw the end results.” 

Kraus was able to salvage an eighth-place finish and maintain his NASCAR K&N Pro Series West points lead after the move made by Deegan. Following the madness at Colorado, Deegan and Kraus were treated to a team meeting the smooth things over and clear the air.

“Everything went alright in the meeting and we’re back on good terms,” Kraus said. “I don’t have any hard feelings, we’ve both moved on and we’re both ready for a clean race at Sonoma.”

The events which took place in Colorado are an example of hard racing done right. Although unfortunate and controversial as this occurred between teammates, this brought tons of exposure to not only NASCAR’s K&N Pro Series West, but the young up and coming drivers of Deegan and Kraus. In a time where it can argued that NASCAR’s upper divisions are lacking personality, the pair offered fans a possible glimpse into the future.

Exactly one week following the incident between Deegan and Kraus, the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series had it’s own share of conflict and drama in the M&M’s 200 at Iowa Speedway.

Early in the final stage, Johnny Sauter moved the No. 16 Toyota Tundra of Austin Hill out of the way to advance his position. Hill would go on to retaliate on Lap 136, sending Sauter’s No. 13 Ford F-150 into the outside wall. Sauter then took things one step further running down Hill under caution and sending both trucks hard into the wall through Turns 3 and 4.

Sauter would go on to be parked for the remainder of the race. NASCAR then suspended the past series champion for this weekend’s upcoming event at WWT Speedway.

“We were racing hard going into Turn 1,” Hill said. “He (Sauter) got into me a bit and I returned the favor. I don’t race like that, so if you’re going to race me like that, I’m not going to put up with it and I think you saw that.”

If Sauter and Hill ended their back and forth feuds in the closing laps following the caution on Lap 136, this incident would have been perfectly fine. The problem resided in Sauter’s retaliation to Hill under caution. When NASCAR officials throw out the yellow flag, drivers are expected to comply with the sanctioning body’s rules of speed and safety.

It’s not uncommon for drivers to give one another a bump during caution periods to voice their displeasure after the way they’ve been raced on the track. But what Sauter did was unforgivable and punishable, plain and simple. Sauter essentially used his truck as a weapon by intentionally wrecking Hill under caution at high speeds and put not only himself and Hill in danger, but his fellow competitors and safety officials as well.

The argument can be made that Hill was just as much at fault for sparking the initial dust up between the two drivers; after all, his product of hard racing and retaliation is what triggered Sauter. However, this was all done under the green flag and within reason.

NASCAR’s Senior Vice President of Competition, Scott Miller said that officials considered handing down penalties to Hill, but they ultimately just opted to punish Sauter for his actions.

“Him (Sauter) driving half a track with a smoking truck, winding through traffic to get to the No. 16 and running over him, then bouncing off the wall and running to into his door was pretty aggressive,” Miller said. “It was definitely not anything that could in any way, shape or form be defended as a racing incident.”

While suspended for this weekend, this will not effect Sauter’s opportunity to compete for the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series championship with a  playoff waiver issued.

“In this case, we felt like his actions certainly warranted being sat down for an event, but it felt a little too harsh to take him straight out of the championship, so we think we landed on what we feel is fair and a deterrent,” Miller concluded.

While Sauter was the only driver suspended for the incident on Lap 137, Miller stated that NASCAR officials would be keeping Hill “under a microscope” throughout the remainder of the season.

Two of NASCAR’s lower series divisions rose to the occasion when the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series had a scheduled off-week and all in all brought more exposure when the sport needed it most. There is a broad spectrum for what can be deemed acceptable and what is punishable when it comes to hard racing and fans got just that with the races at Colorado and Iowa.

While hard racing will almost always provide viewers with piqued interest and excitement, it should be done within reason and this should be recognized– not only by the fans– but from the sport’s athletes as well.

EMAIL COLE AT: colecusumano88@gmail.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Cole_Cusumano_

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management to other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered and endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

NASCAR was Right to Disqualify Chastain

It was a dominant day turned sour for Ross Chastain, as he became the first driver to be disqualified under the new rules implemented by NASCAR.

Chastain won both stages and led 141 of 200 laps en route to initially capturing his second Gander Outdoors Truck Series win of the season. However, after failing post-race inspection, NASCAR, in controversial fashion, immediately stripped him of the victory  and all points earned from the event due to the truck being too low.

It is an unfortunate ordeal for Chastain, who recently announced he was running for truck series points after starting the season pursing a NASCAR Xfinity Series championship. The 26-year-old desperately needed the win and a good day in general to help his chances of making the playoffs.

It is also unfortunate for Niece Motorsports, a team seemingly beginning to find a groove in the sport, who will now face even more pressure to provide equipment capable of winning on a weekly basis.

Most importantly though, it is not the preferred outcome for the fans who watched the event either in-person or on TV who watched one result live, only to be told of a different outcome long after the checkered flag flew, and the television coverage ended. There are likely fans out there that still don’t know Brett Moffitt won his first race of the season.

That being said, NASCAR absolutely made the right call.

For years, drivers and team were able to essentially break the rules, get penalized, but still be declared the “winner,” despite being caught red-handed. Not anymore.

When it was announced that winners had the threat of being stripped of their victory if they were found to be competing with an unfair advantage, it sounded good in theory. However, there was no guarantee that NASCAR was serious until they followed through.

While some may not like it, at the end of the day, Chastain failed the post-race inspection and did not deserve to leave Iowa Speedway with a trophy. NASCAR needed a situation like this to assert their seriousness, and when they got it, those in charge stepped up to the plate and followed through on their word.

Even if Chastain won his appeal and reclaimed his victory, the right call was made Sunday. Teams will always test the boundaries to see what they can and get away with; however, there is now a clear line in the sand as far as possible punishments may go now thanks in part to this ruling.

EMAIL MITCHELL AT mitchell.breuer@popularspeed.com

TWITTER: @MitchellB66

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.

Categories
Trucks

Johnny Sauter Suspended One Race for Contact with Austin Hill

It seems as though Johnny Sauter will not be taking part in the NASCAR Gander Outdoor Truck Series trip to World Wide Technology Raceway at Gateway as a result of being suspended.

Following contact on-track during the event at Iowa Speedway, the ThorSport Racing driver made contact with Austin Hill under caution. Although Sauter will sit out this weekend’s event, he will still be playoff post-season eligible per the sanctioning body with a waiver issued.

“We look back at the history of everything we’ve done and try to react with the precedents that we’ve set and then obviously tailoring those to the situation that we have at hand,” said Scott Miller, NASCAR senior vice president of competition. “In this case, we felt like his actions certainly warranted being sat down for an event, but it felt a little too harsh to take him straight out of the championship, so we think we landed on what we feel is fair and a deterrent.”

Previously, NASCAR has parked drivers for similar incidents. Matt Kenseth sat out two Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series races wrecking Joey Logano under green flag conditions at Martinsville Speedway. Kyle Busch missed a NASCAR XFINITY Series and Cup race at Texas Motor Speedway after wrecking Ron Hornaday, Jr. under caution in the truck series event.

“We tend to look at incidents under caution as more of a retaliatory thing,” Miller said. “Obviously, him driving half a track with a smoking truck and winding through a few cars to get to the 16 and then running over him, then bouncing off the wall and running into his door, it was pretty aggressive. It was definitely not anything that could in any way, shape or form be defended as a racing incident.”

Miller went on to state that NASCAR will also have Sauter and Hill sit down together to talk out their differences prior to Sauter’s return. 

EMAIL ASHLEY AT ashley.mccubbin@popularspeed.com

FOLLOW ON TWITTER:@ladybug388

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of PopularSpeed.com, its owners, management or other contributors. Any links contained in this article should not be considered an endorsement.